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Art talk, news and tips.

Introducing David Cooper to Thumbtack Press

March 11th, 2013 | By: Ben

 For the Love of Listening, David Cooper, illustration art, illustration, art, affordable art prints, art prints, thumbtack press, ttp, illustrator art, character art

David Cooper, For The Love of Listening

One of the first things people notice when they see David Cooper’s work for the first time is the elongated figures that populate all his work, from basketball backboards to giant murals to canvases to ping pong paddles to illustrations to the prints of his work that just went live on his Thumbtack Press artist page.

The figures are definitely human, they’re by no means alien, but they come off as almost super-human, reaching impossible distances, handling impossible grips. Even in pieces without as much sunshine (like Delivering Despair below), their reaching gives David’s work an energy. The characters he creates might be contorted, but they’re not fragmented or chaotic. They’re in the moment, endeavoring, working, faithful of their reach – they might even be having fun.

David told us they’re also part of the fact that his work spans so many mediums. Whether faced with a canvas or a giant blank wall somewhere in Miami, the piece has to fit, and it starts from the very beginning sketching process (which David does by hand). David talked about it in a chat we put up last week:

“The characters are part of my visual language. I love abstracting the human body to fit my composition. It helps me to solve visual challenges I might be faced with during the sketching process.”

We’re in love with this concept of abstracting the human body to fit the composition. It’s not exactly a revolutionary approach – what artist doesn’t battle with the problems of space? – but David’s been able to marry what he calls his “visual language” across all the mediums he works on.

It’s that approach that makes us honored to announce our collaboration with David, and it’s that energy infused in all of David’s work that makes it so original and engaging. The good news is that unlike the murals and one-offs David is known for, you can now actually own David’s work for your walls.

Here’s to more energy, more drawing by hand, and more giant walls to paint.

 

Sacred Ceremony, David Cooper, illustration art, illustration, art, affordable art prints, art prints, thumbtack press, ttp, illustrator art, character art, for the love of listening

David Cooper, Sacred Ceremony

See all of David’s initial offering at his Thumbtack Press artist page.


TTP Repartee With David Cooper

March 8th, 2013 | By: Ben

 Thumbtack press, it must be love, david cooper, affordable art prints, art prints, ttp, illustration art, illustration, illustrator art, character art,

David Cooper, It Must Be Love 

One of the first things people notice when they see David Cooper’s work for the first time is the elongated figures that populate all his work, from basketball backboards to giant murals to canvases to ping pong paddles to illustrations to the prints of his work that just went live on his Thumbtack Press artist page.

The figures are definitely human, they’re by no means alien, but they come off as almost super-human, reaching impossible distances, handling impossible grips. Even in pieces without as much sunshine (like Delivering Despair below), their reaching gives David’s work an energy. The characters he creates might be contorted, but they’re not fragmented or chaotic. They’re in the moment, endeavoring, working, faithful of their reach – they might even be having fun. 

David took the time to chat with us about his process, painting giant murals, sketching by hand, and more below. You can see his entire initial TTP offering here.

___

DC: Morning Ben. Are you there?

TTP: Hey! How you doing?

DC: I’m pretty good. I’m at work producing a cover shoot for the magazine I work for as a photo editor.

TTP: Yeah I noticed on your blog there was a bunch of styled photo work – but your training is in illustration, no? Or have you always done photo stuff?

DC: Yes, I have a BFA from Pratt Institute in Communications Design with a concentration in Illustration, but I’ve always been interested in photography.

TTP: And fashion too, it seems?

DC: Yes. Fashion, covers, and conceptual beauty still lives.

TTP: It’s always been interesting to me how “styling” overlaps with the images themselves. Like, what’s in the images versus how the images lay onto a page.

DC: The styling is a very important part of the shot. It’s one of the many elements that help to create an overall mood.

TTP: Yeah. And it’s like, even though there’s this word “styling” – how is it different from similar composition-related aspects in illustration, painting, etc?

DC: It’s not very different at all. The word “Styling” when referring to photography and painting basically relates to visual language, which will always affect the composition in unique ways.

TTP: True – so where is work exactly, if I can ask? What mag?

DC: The magazine is called Siempre Mujer. I helped start it up back in 2005.

TTP: Oh word. But so back to different contexts, your painting/illustration is also on a million different mediums. That ping pong paddle is so legit. How do you approach different mediums – like, a mural versus a backboard versus a canvas versus something digital?

DC: Thanks man.

TTP: Does it change how/where the idea’s formed?

DC: I try to approach most of my projects in the same way. It all starts with a basic idea and a drawing.

TTP: By hand?

DC: Yes, all of my initial sketches start by hand. Before I start to draw I have to consider what I’m drawing on. If I’m planning a mural, I have to think about the dimensions of the wall. If I’m painting on a basketball, I have to think about drawing on a round shape. The crazier the object, the more I have to plan. One of the most interesting objects I’ve painted on to date has been a Eames lounge chair.

TTP: So, the surface will sometimes dictate the concept and the drawing.

DC: Yes, and the composition.

TTP: In other words it’s not often that you have an idea for one medium that ends up on another? I mean obviously ideas can combine, fuse, overlap, etc., but you seem to corral them into specific projects.

DC: For the most part yes, but I’ve also done pieces that were only intended to be paintings and they were eventually placed on graphic tees and even silk scarves.

TTP: Badass.

DC: Ha!

 

Through Death With Earthly Pleasures, David Cooper, thumbtack press, ttp, illustration art, illustrator art, illustration, affordable art prints, affordable art, art, art prints,

David Cooper, Through Death With Earthly Pleasures

 

TTP: Which mediums do you most like to work with? I mean are there certain ones that you dread or look forward to?

DC: I honestly love them all, but if I had to pick a favorite it would be painting murals. Painting a mural is such an insane experience! There’s nothing like it.

TTP: In what way? Being outside just in itself makes it a win to me.

DC: First of all, painting large is such a rewarding and physical act.

TTP: True.

DC: When I paint a mural, it demands 100% of my mind and body. I totally get consumed by the physical act of creating it.

TTP: Yeah.

DC: I also love the fact that when I paint a mural outside, I’m totally out in the open. It can easily become a man vs. nature scenario, which is a very humbling experience. I also love the fact that people are free to watch me paint and ask me questions. It becomes a way of connecting with the community.

TTP: Ya. It’s incredible. What about the characters that often show up in your murals? With the long limbs, the big heads – are they inspired by anything? (Actually, they’re in a lot of your work, not just murals.)

DC: The characters are part of my visual language. I love abstracting the human body to fit my composition. It helps me to solve visual challenges that I might be faced with during the sketching process.

TTP: Whoa that’s a cool way to think about it. I don’t know that I’ve ever heard that – “abstracting the human body to fit my composition.”

DC: It’s a freeing experience to not have to be confined to a “realistic” point of view.

TTP: Fluid. Ya. Also allows more sort of improv when you’re out there.

DC: Exactly! In 2010 I painted a mural in Miami during Art Basel. It was 95ft long x 25 ft high.

TTP: Sheeeeeeeeeit!

DC: I sketched and planned as much as I could, but once i got to the wall, I freestyled most of the drawing because I didn’t want to feel limited by my own sketch.

TTP: Right. None of that grid system fascism.

DC: I wanted the drawing to feel fresh, new and spontaneous.

TTP: The grid system is dead long live the grid system.

DC: A grid system would just drive me insane. No offense to anyone that believes in the grid system! Ha! It’s just not how “I” go about things.

TTP: The grid system illuminati is gonna come after you. Art school teachers the world over will show up at your place with pitchforks and lanterns.

DC: Man, I’m gonna shut my mouth about the grid system.

TTP: Anyway I don’t want to take up too much of your time – I appreciate this. I had fun. Enjoy your weekend.

DC: Same to you. Speak to you soon.

 

Delivering Despair, David Cooper, thumbtack press, ttp, affordable art prints, affordable art, art prints, art, illustration art, illustration, illustrator art,

David Cooper, Delivering Despair

___

See David’s Thumbtack Press artist page here.


Introducing Enzo Peres-Labourdette to Thumbtack Press

March 5th, 2013 | By: Ben

 The Crane, Enzo Peres-Labourdette, thumbtack press, fashion, ttp, affordable art prints, art prints, affordable art, illustration, illustration art,

Enzo Peres-Labourdette, The Crane

 

Big welcome to Enzo Peres-Labourdette, the newest addition to Thumbtack Press. A fabulous Dutch fashion illustrator, Enzo’s been making a name for himself through pieces that feel like they’re set in a bedazzled Upper East Side jungle of gilded patterns, like a bizarro Versailles Hall of Mirrors.

But Enzo’s work is also classic. See the careful historical references to Picasso and fashion among settings that seem innocuous and placid until they burst into stories of glamour and intrigue and more.

Things in Enzo’s work:

- Fur
- Champagne
- Helmets
- Robots
- Necklaces
- Stalactites
- A crane
- Homicide
- Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon
- Green hair
- Laboratories
- Crystals
- Human pods
- A crown

He’s bombastic. As Enzo told us in one anecdote (from the interview you can find here):

“When I started my art studies I liked doing everything in black & white with some hints of red, to get that Sin City look, until a teacher told me, “Enzo, your work is good, but you should start using more color.” The thing is that I’m quiet dramatic (might be because I’m from southern Europe, I’m not sure) so my reaction to his advice was you want colour? I’ll show you colour!”

Color indeed.

You can see Enzo’s initial TTP collection in full at his Thumbtack Press artist page.

 

 Party, Enzo Peres Labourdette, illustration art, illustration, affordable art, affordable art prints, thumbtack press, art, ttp,

Enzo Peres-Labourdette, Party

Artists Talking: Q&A With Newest Thumbtack Press Artist Enzo Peres-Labourdette

March 2nd, 2013 | By: Ben

 The Crane by Enzo Peres-Labourdette

Enzo Peres-Labourdette, The Crane

Newest Thumbtack Press artist Enzo Peres-Labourdette‘s work has a classic feel, and not only because it references art and fashion classics. It’s also the settings and the storytelling, the composition and the depth, the patterns and the palette. His work includes the future, homicide, an oracle, bedazzled settings, patterns on patterns, laboratory experiments, and more.

Enzo took the time to answer some questions about his work. We ended up going through his process with paint and computers, color, Chanel, and more. His work is live and available for purchase – starting at $19.99 – at his Thumbtack Press artist page

___

One of the first things in your bio is your concern and passion for “traditional media.” It would seem to go against the trend of your generation of young artists that are constantly seeking new medias to express themselves in, but on the other hand many young artists are finding more meaning in working with paint and getting off the computer. What is it about traditional mediums that make them fun or inspiring? Do you do any work digitally?

Secretly I use the computer a lot! Many people forget that before you paint, there is a lot of time that goes into research. I’m very happy I’m a 90′s kid and have always been surrounded by technology (shock value for people who are a bit older: I can’t remember the sound internet dial-up used to make). The internet makes it so easy to look up images from all around the world, reference material, etc.

All the image-creation is done by hand. The reason I do this is because paint pigments are a lot more vivid and surprising than anything that can be done digitally (I’m sure the computer will catch up in the future). It’s also a lot easier to discover new things by accident, or to use your fingertips or old brushes for texture. And then there is also the health part, staring at a computer screen hurts my eyes after a long time and using a tablet and keyboard hurts my wrists.

The one digital process that you can’t escape nowadays is scanning and adjusting the colours in photoshop, which I actually like doing, because once an image is on my screen it’s somehow more distant from me and it’s easier to notice mistakes. The last big plus working by hand has is that when I die, there might still be some of my work in an attic somewhere, it would be a pity if it all disappears in the digital world no?

Your TTP collection is PACKED with color. There’s color everywhere. All of the pieces have a certain palette, but even within the pieces colors seem to pop from everywhere. How do you manage to keep the palettes and the rhythms of the colors straight, if that makes sense? Do you start with a certain palette and go from there, or do you let the colors go where they may?

Funny thing is that when I started my art studies I liked doing everything in black & white with some hints of red, to get that Sin City look, until a teacher told me, “Enzo, your work is good, but you should start using more color.” The thing is that I’m quite dramatic (might be because I’m from southern Europe, I’m not sure) so my reaction to his advice was, “You want colour? I’ll show you colour!”

I immediately started researching and discovered that (bright) colour is something very integral to human history. What I like about living in Europe is that it’s so full of history that you find lot’s of different things. So I realized that there where hundreds of ways to use colour in my paintings. Somehow we wrongly assume that the past is black and white and sepia, but that’s just how the colour TV used to be. History is filled with art and clothes that were very bright-coloured.

And as to how I manage to keep the colours straight, I achieve that by being a copycat and brave. It can be a bit scary to use a certain colour, but I once read that we wrongly assume that certain colours clash. Because we are brought up to believe that red and pink clash, but then in India you’ll see those two colours together all the time. So I just put them where I want them to be without worrying to much about it.

 Murder in the Chateau, Enzo Peres Labourdette, thumbtack press, ttp, illustration, illustration art, illustrator art, affordable art prints, art, art prints

Enzo Peres-Labourdette, Murder in the Chateau

I know you’re interested in fashion, and it’s interesting because there are now a few TTPers who incorporate ideas of design and fashion into their illustration, painting, or other work (Cristian Grossi for example). Where is the intersection of fashion and painting for you? Do you have any experience designing clothes or have any desire to? Who’s your favorite fashion label right now and historically?

I got interested in fashion when I did a bit of modeling. I was fascinated by the idea that you could change your personality just by wearing certain clothes. You can feel strong by wearing black leather, or attractive when wearing a certain perfume. What I liked most about it is that it’s all just a big fat lie and there is nothing wrong about it. Because everything in life is a lie/story to a certain extent. When I want to paint a lady that has to radiate a certain personality, I just borrow the idea of a designer that has thought about it and has created something that shows the feeling I’m looking for. It would be arrogant of me to think I could come up with a better looking dress than somebody who has dedicated their life to creating them. When you look at the great paintings of queens in the past, all the dresses and jewels weren’t made up by the painter, but already created especially for that queen, to show her power and wealth.

Oh and I love all the dramatic designers like McQueen and Galliano but Chanel will always have the place closest to my heart, because I’m French.

There’s also a lot of drama in some of your work. Like “Murder in the Chateau” and “Party” – these are not really static pieces, you get the feeling they’re snapshots of a narrative, as if something just happened or something is about to happen. How does narrative operate in your work, if at all? What are some of the stories you’re trying to tell?

What I like to do is create a kind of cliffhanger. Life is full of those moments when you’d really love to know what happens next (for example two guys fighting in the supermarket). I want to paint moments that make people curious, but also makes them uncertain if they want to see what will happen/has happened. Something else I hope occurs is that people don’t get bored of my work when it’s hanging in their home, and that they keep imagining new stories around the moment I created.

Tell me a little bit about your multinational background and what it was like growing up, it seems, all over Europe! Is there a spot you always return to? Are you happy where you’re living now (and where is that)?

I think a difference between Europe and America is that it doesn’t matter if you’re from Georgia or California – you’re still an American. If you’re from France or Holland you speak a totally different language, have different habits and foods, etc. So moving when you’re a kid creates the feeling that you’re European, instead of feeling like you “belong” to a certain country. I’ve talked to other Europeans that have moved when they were young and they have the same experience. I like it, being the outsider always makes for good conversations and makes it less scary moving to other places. I’m living in Groningen now (a small city two hours from Amsterdam, close to Germany) but I’m certain I’ll be leaving for another country in the near future.

___

See Enzo’s initial offering – available starting at $19.99 – at his Thumbtack Press page!  

 

Party, Enzo Peres Labourdette, illustration, illustrator art, illustration art, thumbtack press, ttp, affordable art prints, art prints, art,

Enzo Peres-Labourdette, Party


Ana Galvañ doing WORK

February 26th, 2013 | By: Ben

 ana galvan, carnivale, illustration, illustrator art, art prints, art, thumbtack press, ttp

Ana Galvañ, Carnivale

We’ve worked with Ana Galvañ, one of Thumbtack Press’s elite group of illustrators from around the world, to thoroughly replenish her Thumbtack Press collection. Go there now and you’ll see new pieces that are both firmly within her wheelhouse – seriously, who conjures a woman’s face with as much style as Ana does? – while also pushing it.

There are works packed with stories and personality, like Carnivale above, and there are pieces with subtle (or not so subtle) messages and narratives and warnings and pace. Ladytron  emerges from the sea. A goddess floats by.

It’s truly a pleasure to work with Ana and to offer her work as prints. Based in Spain, she’s an illustrator whose work never seems to settle neatly into the term “illustration.” It’s personal, it’s funny, it’s interesting, it’s everything, it’s the world.

Buy Ana’s work at her Thumbtack Press artist page.

 

Amsterdam, Ana Galvañ, thumbtack press, ttp, art prints, illustration art, illustration, art prints, art, affordable art prints

Ana Galvañ, Amsterdam

TTP Repartee With Xiau-Fong Wee Part 2!

February 21st, 2013 | By: Ben

 Ruff, Xiau-Fong Wee, illustration, thumbtack press, ttp, affordable art prints, art prints

Xiau-Fong Wee, Ruff!

 

California artist Xiau-Fong Wee is the newest artist whose work we’re proud to offer on Thumbtack Press. Her initial collection is comprised of pieces from her Crinkle series, which as she explains in the chat below, “Is an ever growing army of animals armed with guns, wearing glasses, ready to conquer the world!”

The Crinkle series can be thought of as expertly drawn cuteness, but it’s also about things appearing in ways you might not expect (a common theme here at TTP). Xiau-Fong was kind enough to take some time out from her work drawing a pig at the time to speak to us about how she started the Crinkle series, how people have reacted to it, how she came up with their titles (!), and life as an artist in San Francisco. Part 1 of the chat is here.

See Xiau-Fong’s work on her Thumbtack Press page, starting at $19.99!

-

TTP: Totally. So are you able to work on art stuff full time these days?

XFW: Yes, I am very fortunate to be able to paint and draw most of the time! For now! You
never know what will happen next when you are in the art business ;-)

XFW: I wish i could visit more cities though…never been to Chicago. New York would be nice to visit too.

TTP: Chicago is great – def a different feel than SF.

XFW: Every city is unique

TTP: Ok so back to Crinkle for a second – do you have a favorite one? And I’m curious about people’s reactions to it like, do people get it?

XFW: No, i don’t have a favorite one, the part about my art i most enjoy is the process of
it – seeing something emerge from my own doing.

I was surprised at people’s reactions to it! When I drew my first animal, I did not think much about it and I gave it away to an uncle for Christmas.

TTP: Do people gravitate towards certain animals?

XFW: I notice people tend to gravitate towards cats and then dogs and bunnies…I think it is because they can relate to them as their pets.

TTP: Cats. Of course! Should’ve guessed that.

XFW: Some people do not understand the art though…

TTP: What do they say?

XFW: They ask me about the glasses… why glasses? I just tell them that it protects their eyes, of course! We need eye protection too when we go to battle!

TTP: Haaaaaaa

XFW: Some people think that i am encouraging violence too. Or some people think I am trying to make a political statement about ‘big dogs’ and ‘under dogs’ of the economy.

TTP: Whoaaa reading into it a bit much I guess,

TTP: What did your uncle say when he got it? What was the animal he got ?

XFW: Yeah, my concepts are actually very simple :-P

XFW: My uncle loved the drawing. He actually wanted to buy it from me, but it was around Xmas, so why not just gift it? He got “Fuzz!” (the prairie dog). That was the very first soldier. My first few animals had names that did not really imitate war cries he he he

 

 Grawr!, Xiau-Fong Wee, affordable art prints, art prints, thumbtack press, ttp

Xiau-Fong Wee, Grawr!

 

TTP: Oh man the names are a whole other story – where do they come from??

XFW: Yeah, after Fuzz, Fluff, and Floof, I started to run out of names that described the physical appearance of the animal. Oh and Gruff. So I moved onto the noises they make…and ran into the problem of animals that don’t really make sounds

TTP: Right! Ha

XFW: So I had to invent sounds I thought they would make if they could yell…kind of fun, trying to sound out weird words.

TTP: Oh man that’s good

XFW: And lucky I live alone in my apartment…if I had a roommate, he/she would think I am crazy, talking strange noises to myself haha.

TTP: Too funny!

TTP: But anyway I don’t want to take up any more of your time. This was fun we appreciate it.

XFW: Thank you! It was great talking with you! Enjoy the rest of your night.

TTP: Ciao

XFW: Bye!

__

Part 1 of this chat is here. And make sure to see her Thumbtack Press artist page, all prints start at $19.99!


New Prints By Hernan Paganini Now Available!

February 20th, 2013 | By: Ben

 Al Destino Con Amor, Hernan Paganini, thumbtack press, ttp, abstract art prints, art prints, affordable art prints, art,

Hernan Paganini, Al Destino Con Amor.

 

Well well well. More more art. Argentinian artist Hernan Paganini’s Thumbtack Press artist page is yet another one with a bunch of new pieces.

Hernan is the TTP abstract champion. His work always bounces with a legit energy – look at how pieces like Radio stand out with their bursts of color and shape - and we’re honored to be able to offer even more of them!

 

 Amanece La Voz Dormida, hernan paganini, ttp, thumbtack press, abstract art prints, art prints, affordable art prints

Hernan Paganini, Amanece La Voz Dormida. 

Browse through the rest of Hernan’s work (starting at $19.99!) here.

 

 La Belleza De Mi Mujer Se Proyecta En Todo, Hernan Paganini, ttp, thumbtack press, affordable art prints, art prints, abstract art, abstract art prints,

Hernan Paganini, La Belleza De Mi Mujer Se Proyecta En Todo.

 

 Somos Inagotables, Hernan Paganini, thumbtack press, ttp, abstract art prints, art prints, abstract art, affordable art prints, art

Hernan Paganini, Somos Inagotables.

 


TTP Repartee with Xiau-Fong Wee Part 1!

February 19th, 2013 | By: Ben

 Mrrra!, Xiau-Fong Wee, thumbtack press, ttp, ttp repartee, affordable art prints, illustration art, illustration, illustrator art

Xiau-Fong Wee, Mrrra!

California artist Xiau-Fong Wee is the newest artist whose work we’re proud to offer on Thumbtack Press. Her initial collection is comprised of pieces from her Crinkle series, which as she explains in the chat below, “Is an ever growing army of animals armed with guns, wearing glasses, ready to conquer the world!”

The Crinkle series can be thought of as expertly drawn cuteness, but it’s also about things appearing in ways you might not expect (a common theme here at TTP). Xiau-Fong was kind enough to take some time out from her work drawing a pig at the time to speak to us about how she started the Crinkle series, how people have reacted to it, how she came up with their titles (!), and life as an artist in San Francisco. Part 2 of the chat is here.

See Xiau-Fong’s work on her Thumbtack Press page, starting at $19.99!

_

[Note: We chatted with Xiau-Fong in the fall. But as gun violence and gun control has risen to the front of so many national conversations, we followed up and asked Xiau-Fong about possible reactions to her work. Xiau-Fong said:

"People enjoy the balance between adorable and fierce. But not surprisingly there are people who find my animal army offensive, blaming me for promoting violence and aggression. The balance between cute violent and violent violent is really up to the viewer.

I am just having fun! I love contrasts: cute and violent, corruption and innocence, soft and fuzzy versus cold and metallic. Looks can be deceiving!"

In part 2, Xiau-Fong speaks more about reactions to her work, from the guns to complex political messaging.]

-

TTP: Hey Xiau-Fong you there?

Xiau-Fong Wee: Hi! How are you!

TTP: I’m good good I ended up spending a lot of today downtown with a friend I hadn’t
seen in years. I like walking around Chicago with people who’ve never been here.

XFW: Sounds like fun, it is always nice to catch up with old friends!

TTP: How are you? What are you up to? I’m fine, doing some acrylic painting right now! Painting a pig…

TTP: So can you talk about the Crinkle series on TTP?

XFW: Right up front, the Crinkle series are all drawings, charcoal on paper. It is an ever growing army of animals armed with guns, wearing glasses, ready to conquer the world! So you better watch out… But below the surface they are a reminder to not judge a book by its cover, and that looks can be deceiving… it is the cute and innocent who will turn against you!

TTP: Haaa awesome! I love the army idea.

XFW: He he he, good for the zombies.

 


Xiau-Fong Wee, schnork, illustrator art, affordable art prints, ttp repartee, thumbtack press, tpp

Xiau-Fong Wee, Schnork!

 

TTP: When did you start it?

XFW: I started it a couple years ago…it started as random crappy sketches and I found an opportunity to turn one of my sketches into a finished drawing.

TTP: What’s the context? Were you is SF then too?

XFW: Yes, I was living in San Francisco, and I was still in school then too!

TTP: For your MFA? Where?

XFW: Actually, I graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the Academy of Art University of San Francisco.

TTP: Oh nice!

XFW: I don’t think i will be going for my MFA.

TTP: Well you’re doing fine without it I mean get real.

XFW: Aw ha ha

TTP: Were you also born out west?

XFW: Yep, ABC all the way! Born in Salinas CA, grew up in Los Gatos CA, and now
living in San Francisco. Love the city.

TTP: Where in the city are you?

XFW: I live near Chinatown. I love how i am near most everything… downtown, north beach, it only takes 10 – 15 minutes to get to a different district. I enjoy it here, the weather is nice, architecture is interesting, and it is just an artsy place to be in :)

__

Part 2 of this chat is here. And make sure to see her Thumbtack Press artist page, all prints start at $19.99!

 


New Art by Ken Keirns and Ana Galvañ

February 18th, 2013 | By: Ben

 Ken Keirns illustration affordable art prints thumbtack press ttp painting nature vs nurture

Ken Keirns, Nature Vs. Nurture

So much new stuff!! This is another shout out for all the new art we’re offering. Ken Keirns’s new pieces are all available here, and Ana Galvañ’s are all here.

As always, prints start at $19.99!!

 

 Amsterdam Ana Galvañ affordable art prints thumbtack press ttp spanish illustrator prints illustration

Ana Galvañ, Amsterdam

See them also on Facebook, Tumblr, and Pinterest!


New Art Bloody Everywhere! + Last Day for 15% Off!

February 14th, 2013 | By: Ben
 

New Art at Thumbtack Press!

Good lord we have so much new art to share! We’re so excited we could just whip out a numbered list. Hold on. We love numbered lists. Let’s gooo:

1. We have new pieces by Thumbtack Press favorites – wait, can you do a numbered list INSIDE OF A NUMBERED LIST?

1. There are ten new Ken Keirns pieces. Spoiler alert: There is a monkey/unicorn (Monkeycorn), a small pig, and Oscar the Grouch. See them all here.

2. There are seven new pieces by the “TTP Magritte,” Rick Boorhorst. If you don’t know about the work Rick and his family (kids too) do, read this and see his Thumbtack Press page.

3. Spanish illustrator Ana Galvan has ten new pieces on her Thumbtack Press page. We’re not sure if anybody does illustrations that feel like adventures quite like Ana. Also: stilts.

4. Argentinean geometric/abstract champion Hernan Pagagini added four pieces. They pop and move and pop and move with a quickness. See the rest of his work here.

5. Chris Lyles added a snakey piece to add to his unique pieces, always onto some other view of the animals you think you know.

6. Don’t forget also about our newest Thumbtack Press artist, Italian pop surrealist hero Stefano Zattera. His work is here.

Ladytron by Ana Galvan
Ana Galvan, Ladytron

2. Ok back on the original numbered list! 

3. Anyway the point is that we’re thrilled to share all this with you.  Don’t forget that today is the last day you can get 15% OFF the entire store in honor of Valentine’s Day (use code “AMOUR” at checkout). You won’t get prints or canvasses in time for dinner, but you could get a gift card by then. 

 

4. Also we’re on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, and even the one where you pin stuff. If you use the social mediaz, stop by and say hi! 

 

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